Atoms Laser-Cooled Below the Doppler-Cooling Limit

  • P. D. Lett
  • C. I. Westbrook
  • R. N. Watts
  • S. L. Rolston
  • P. L. Gould
  • H. J. Metcalf
  • W. D. Phillips

Abstract

We have previously reported [1] laser cooling of atoms in optical molasses to temperatures as low as 40 μK; more recently, we have measured the temperature of this three-dimensional gas of Na atoms to be as low as -10 +20 μK. These low temperatures are in strong disagreement with the traditional theory of laser cooling, which predicted a lower limit of 240 μK. Temperatures below the “cooling limit” were surprising and unexpected. They pointed out the inadequacy of the usual theory for explaining a rather simple experiment. The results have great practical interest because it now appears to be relatively easy to obtain temperatures much lower than previously thought possible.

Keywords

Cesium 

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References

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    P. D. Lett et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 61, 169 (1988).CrossRefADSGoogle Scholar
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    S. Chu, presented at the Eleventh International Conference on Atomic Physics, Paris, July 1988.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin, Heidelberg 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. D. Lett
    • 1
  • C. I. Westbrook
    • 1
  • R. N. Watts
    • 1
  • S. L. Rolston
    • 1
  • P. L. Gould
    • 2
  • H. J. Metcalf
    • 3
  • W. D. Phillips
    • 1
  1. 1.National Institute of Standards and Technology, (formerly National Bureau of Standards)GaithersburgUSA
  2. 2.Department of PhysicsUniversity of ConnecticutUSA
  3. 3.Dept. of PhysicsS.U.N.Y.Stony BrookUSA

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