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Characterization of Electrolyte Transport Mechanisms and Compartments by the Use of the Markers Rb and Br

  • A. Dörge
  • F. X. Beck
  • R. Rick
  • W. Nagel
  • K. Thurau
Conference paper
Part of the Springer Series in Biophysics book series (BIOPHYSICS, volume 4)

Abstract

The application of electron microprobe analysis to biological tissues allows the determination of electrolytes within individual cells or even subcellular structures. This capability enables the elucidation of the transport pathways for different electrolytes in different cell types of an epithelium. One way to clarify transepithelial cellular transport routes of ions is the exchange of the ions in question against marker ions which are not common in biological fluids but which are similarly transported. If the marker ion is added to that side of the epithelium from which the flux originates those cells involved in the transport should be marked. Furthermore marker ions can also be used to elucidate complex transport processes, such as cotransports, across a single cell membrane. During recent years we have used the markers Br and Rb to characterize transport mechanisms in several epithelial tissues. Rb instead of K was employed to elucidate the transport characteristics of a basolaterally located electrolyte cotransport system involved in cellular volume regulation of amphibian skins. Br was substituted for Cl in the apical and basal bathing solutions of toad skin to gain further information on the route of trans-cellular Cl transport. Using Rb in the luminal bathing solution of rabbit urinary bladder, it was possible to localize the Na transport compartment in this multilayered epithelium.

Keywords

Apical Side Frog Skin Basal Side Amphibian Skin Multilayered Epithelium 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Dörge
    • 1
  • F. X. Beck
    • 1
  • R. Rick
    • 1
    • 2
  • W. Nagel
    • 1
  • K. Thurau
    • 1
  1. 1.Physiologisches InstitutUniversität MünchenMünchen 2Germany
  2. 2.Department of Physiology and Biophysics Nephrology Research and Training Center University StationUniversity of Alabama in BirminghamBirminghamUSA

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