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Chromosome Transplantation and Applications of Flow Cytometry in Plants

  • A. M. M. de Laat
  • H. A. Verhoeven
  • K. Sree Ramulu
Part of the Biotechnology in Agriculture and Forestry book series (AGRICULTURE, volume 9)

Abstract

Conventional plant breeding is gradually supplemented with novel techniques, e.g., in vitro propagation, selection at the cellular level and genetic manipulation. Genetic engineering has become realistic with the recent progress in molecular biology, cell biology, and tissue culture. By circumvention of sexual reproduction, the natural barriers of incompatibility can be bypassed. Whereas conventional breeding deals with combining whole genomes, differential transfer of genetic traits has become possible now. In the case where a monogenic trait has been characterized at the molecular level, the identified gene can be cloned and transferred into plant cells via DNA vectors (e.g., the Agrobacterium-derived Ti or Ri plasmids (Depicker et al. 1983) or viruses like CaMV (Brisson et al. 1984), or by direct DNA-uptake (Krens et al. 1982; Potrykus et al. 1985). The genetically modified cells are subsequently regenerated to transgenic plants.

Keywords

Flow Cytometry Metaphase Chromosome Plant Chromosome Plant Protoplast Flow Sorting 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. M. M. de Laat
    • 1
  • H. A. Verhoeven
    • 1
  • K. Sree Ramulu
    • 1
  1. 1.Research Institute ItalWageningenThe Netherlands

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