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Correlation of Levels of Platinum and Selenium in Rats Treated with Cisplatin and Sodium Selenite

  • H. Sakurai
  • K. Tsuchiya
  • S. Hirai
  • Y. Okada
  • H. Haraguchi
Conference paper

Abstract

The ability of selenium compounds to reduce the toxicity of mercury compounds has been demonstrated in animals (Parizek and Ostadalove 1967; Hill 1974) and humans (Kosta et al. 1975), the molar ratio of mercury to selenium being approx-imately 1 : 1 in certain organs after this combination therapy. Among selenium compounds, sodium selenite was found by us (Komiya et al. 1977) to have the most powerful protective effect against toxicity of mercuric chloride.

Keywords

Neutron Activation Analysis Testicular Cancer Subcellular Fraction Sodium Selenite Mercuric Chloride 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. Sakurai
    • 1
  • K. Tsuchiya
    • 1
  • S. Hirai
    • 2
  • Y. Okada
    • 2
  • H. Haraguchi
    • 3
  1. 1.Faculty of Pharmaceutical SciencesUniversity of TokushimaSho-machi 1, Tokushima 770Japan
  2. 2.Atomic Energy Research LaboratoryMusashi Institute of TechnologyTama-ku, Kawasaki-shi, Kanagawa 215Japan
  3. 3.Department of Chemistry, Faculty of ScienceUniversity of TokyoBukyo-ku, Tokyo 113Japan

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