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Lake Eyre and Other Temperate Lakes

  • Barbara Javor
Part of the Brock/Springer Series in Contemporary Bioscience book series (BROCK/SPRINGER)

Abstract

Unlike hypersaline environments of marine origin, terminal continental lakes (which have no outlet to the ocean) may have distinct chemical compositions dependent on the weathering of local rocks, salt transport, and evaporation. Australian Lake Eyre, the lakes of Saskatchewan, and other smaller, temperate lakes have not received the scientific attention that the Great Salt Lake, the Dead Sea, or the alkaline lakes of Africa and North America (discussed in Chapters 18–20) have. However, the few microbiological studies on the lesser-known lakes described here indicate that microbial activity can be found in extreme salinities and in brines of unusual composition in temperate climates.

Keywords

Saline Lake Temperate Lake Phototrophic Bacterium Great Salt Lake Hypersaline Lake 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Barbara Javor

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