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Similarities Between Information-Processing Abnormalities of Actively Symptomatic Schizophrenic Patients and High-Risk Children

  • K. H. Nuechterlein
  • K. M. Zaucha

Abstract

Research aimed at identifying abnormalities in the processing of information by schizophrenic patients has been an important direction in the search for the mechanisms that may underlie schizophrenic symptomatology. The early systematic descriptions of schizophrenia by Eugen Bleuler gave prominence to the hypothesis that most schizophrenic symptomatology could be traced to a “disconnecting of associative threads” that form the relationships between ideas (Bleuler, 1911/1950, p. 21). Recent investigators have refined the proposition that primary malfunctions in elementary cognitive processes contribute substantially to formal thought disorder (e.g., Maher, 1972, 1983). Hemsley (1977) and Frith (1979), among others, have also suggested ties between a primary cognitive deficit and the secondary formation of delusions and hallucinations, symptoms which are central for the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 3rd edition (DSM-III; 1980) and its revised edition (DSM-III-R; 1987) diagnoses of schizophrenic disorder.

Keywords

Serial Position Schizophrenic Patient Serial Recall Distraction Condition Foster Child 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. H. Nuechterlein
  • K. M. Zaucha

There are no affiliations available

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