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Cutting Oil Dermatitis: A Review of 115 Patients

  • J. S. C. English
  • R. J. G. Rycroft

Summary

We have investigated 115 patients presenting with dermatoses, who worked with cutting oils. The study period was from 1986 to 1987. There were 111 men and 4 women, with ages ranging from 16 to 66 years (mean 42 ± 14.3 years). The final diagnoses were as follows: 28 patients had endogenous hand eczema and irritant contact dermatitis (ICD); 22 allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) and ICD; 21 ICD alone; 19 ACD alone; 12 endogenous hand eczema; 6 other (non-eczematous) conditions; 4 ACD, ICD and endogenous hand eczema; and 3 ACD and endogenous hand eczema. Formaldehyde-releasing biocides were the commonest cause of allergic reactions in the cutting oil series. Reactions were also seen to colophony, formaldehyde, nickel, rubber, dichromate and epoxy resin in the International Contact Dermatitis Research Group (ICDRG) standard series. As 42% of the patients had relevant positive patch tests, patch testing remains an essential investigation in the management of cutting oil dermatitis.

Key words

Cutting oil dermatitis Irritant Allergic Formaldehyde-releasing biocides Colophony Occupational 

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References

  1. 1.
    Alomar A, Conde-Salazar L, Romaguera C (1985) Occupational dermatoses from cutting oils. Contact Dermatitis 12: 129–138.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Angelini G, Meneghini CL (1977) Dermatitis in engineers due to synthetic coolants. Contact Dermatitis 3:219–220.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. S. C. English
    • 1
  • R. J. G. Rycroft
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Occupational DermatosesStJohn’s Hospital for Diseases of the SkinLondonUK

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