Injections of Interleukins Around Tumor-Draining Lymph Nodes: A New Mode of Immunotherapy

  • G. Forni
  • M. Giovarelli
  • C. Jemma
  • M. C. Bosco
  • G. Cortesina
  • A. De Stefani
  • G. Cavallo
  • M. Forni
  • D. Boraschi
  • P. Musiani
Conference paper

Abstract

There are two main kinds of immune strategy which can be used against neoplasia. The first potentiates a selected effector arm. In vitro culture of lymphocytes with exogenous interleukin-2 (IL-2) generates lymphokine-activa-ted killer (LAK) activity or leads to the expansion of T cytotoxic lymphocytes. Their reinfusion together with high doses of IL-2 mediates the regression of a variety of murine and human tumors (Rosenberg et al. 1986, 1987). Alternatively, the host immune system can be “helped” to recognize and react against the tumor itself. Here the therapeutic maneuver is regulatory.

Keywords

Shrinkage Sarcoma Prostaglandin 

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. Forni
    • 1
  • M. Giovarelli
    • 4
  • C. Jemma
    • 1
  • M. C. Bosco
    • 1
  • G. Cortesina
    • 2
  • A. De Stefani
    • 2
  • G. Cavallo
    • 2
  • M. Forni
    • 3
  • D. Boraschi
    • 5
  • P. Musiani
    • 6
  1. 1.Institute of MicrobiologyUniversity of TurinTurinItaly
  2. 2.ORL ClinicUniversity of TurinItaly
  3. 3.Department of PathologyRegina Margherita Children HospitalTurinItaly
  4. 4.Dept. of Experimental MedicineUniversity of L’AquilaL’AquilaItaly
  5. 5.Centro ricerche SclavoSienaItaly
  6. 6.Dept. of PathologyUniversity of ChietiChietiItaly

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