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Development and Improvement of Analytical Methods for Specification Scheme of Al in the Mobile Soil Phase

  • H. Klöppel
  • W. Kördel
  • S. Schmid
  • W. Klein
Conference paper
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (volume 23)

Abstract

The release of Al in the soil is often discussed as one cause of forest decline due to soil acidification values under 4.2 are reached, elevated concentrations of Al appear in the soil leachates. In order to assess the phytotoxic potential of aluminium present in the soil solution a differentiated determination of the Al-species is necessary. In recent years especially photometric and ion exchange procedures as well as various filtration, radiation and decomposition techniques have been applied to obtain a physical or chemical speciation of aluminium. Physical speciation is applied to differentiate with regard to the particle sizes (e.g. distinction between colloidal and non-colloidal aluminium); chemical speciation allows a classification of the Al-species with respect to their kinetic and thermodynamic properties. Campbell [Campbell et al. 1983] developed an ion exchange/UV radiation procedure which is applicable to differentiate between organic and inorganic forms of non-exchangeable aluminium. They found that in the investigated natural waters the major part of the non-exchangeable Al occurred as organic complexes.

Keywords

Zone Length Total Aluminium Speciation Scheme Geological Survey Water Supply Paper Acid Irrigation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. Klöppel
    • 1
  • W. Kördel
    • 1
  • S. Schmid
    • 1
  • W. Klein
    • 1
  1. 1.Fraunhofer-Institut für Umweltchemie und ÖkotoxikologieSchmallenberg-GrafschaftGermany

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