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Effects of 3Methylcholanthrene-coated Asbestos on Hematological Status of F1 (NZB*C57B1/6) Mice

  • B. Pietrzyca
  • A. Moniewska
  • A. Lange
Conference paper
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (volume 30)

Abstract

We have previously shown that asbestos fibres coated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) facilitate presentation of PAH to microsomal enzymes. This produces genotoxic effect which was seen in the Salmonella typhimurium/mammalian microsome mutagenicity test (Szyba and Lange 1983). Also we have already documented that 3-methylcholanthrene (3MC)-coated chrysotile induces a high level activity of aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylases (AHH) after intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection to inducible C57B1/6 and F1(NZB*C57Bl/6) mice (Dzugaj et al. 1985). The latter mice were chosen to investigate the effect of i.p. injected 3MC coated chrysotile A either any of these compounds alone on the survival rate and the hematological status.

Keywords

Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Malignant Mesothelioma Reticulocyte Count Auto Immune Hemolytic Anemia Hematological Status 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. Pietrzyca
    • 1
  • A. Moniewska
    • 1
  • A. Lange
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Immunology and Experimental TherapyCzerska 12Poland

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