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Import of Preprocecropin A and Related Precursor Proteins into the Endoplasmic Reticulum

  • Gabriel Schlenstedt
  • Elmar Wachter
  • Maria Sagstetter
  • Frederic Morel
  • Richard Zimmermann
  • Gudmundur H. Gudmundsson
  • Hans G. Boman
Conference paper
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (volume 40)

Abstract

The cecropins are a family of potent antibacterial proteins that constitute a main part of the inducible cell-free immunity in insects (Boman and Hultmark, 1981, 1987). The secretory proteins cecropins A, B, and D from cecropia moth (Hyalophora cecropia) vary in size from 35 to 37 amino acid residues and are made as preproproteins with a size of 62 to 64 residues (Lidholm et al., 1987). Besides of the biological function of the mature forms, this protein family is interesting with respect to the processing steps involved in maturation of the prepro-forms to the biologically active proteins and with respect to the mechanism of import of the precursor proteins into the endoplasmic reticulum.

Keywords

Microsomal Membrane Hybrid Protein Signal Recognition Particle Signal Peptidase Docking Protein 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gabriel Schlenstedt
    • 1
  • Elmar Wachter
    • 1
  • Maria Sagstetter
    • 1
  • Frederic Morel
    • 1
  • Richard Zimmermann
    • 1
  • Gudmundur H. Gudmundsson
    • 2
  • Hans G. Boman
    • 2
  1. 1.Institut für Physiologische Chemie, Physikalische Biochemie und ZellbiologieUniversität MünchenMünchen 2Federal Republic of Germany
  2. 2.Department of MicrobiologyUniversity of StockholmStockholmSweden

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