Organized Crime in the Federal Republic of Germany

  • E. Rebscher
  • W. Vahlenkamp
Conference paper

Abstract

Within the West German police forces, there has been little agreement concerning the magnitude and the structure of organized crime. The fact that estimates of this phenomenon range from exaggeration to denial of its existence has been a source of irritation for both police and policymakers. In 1982, a committee made up of leaders of both the federal and state police worked out a definition of organized crime: Several persons working together on a regular basis for the purpose of engaging in criminal activities, frequently taking advantage of modern infrastructures, with the aim of obtaining fast, easy, and large profits. There is still some controversy over this definition. Many police practitioners feel it is too general. However, for the design of any program to combat organized crime there must be a clear understanding of what this type of criminal behavior constitutes.

Keywords

Europe Expense Kelly Tempo Monopoly 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. Rebscher
  • W. Vahlenkamp

There are no affiliations available

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