Advertisement

Mechanisms in Systemic Induced Disease Resistance

  • Andres Binder
  • Gianni Baer
  • Christina Hofmann
  • Kati Kováts
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (ASIH, volume 36)

Abstract

Systemic induced disease resistance in whole plants has been observed with a number of plant pathogen systems (for a review see Kuc 1987). The best resistance effects against diseases caused by viruses, bacteria and fungi have been achieved by preinfection with the same or different microorganisms. To explain these effects, systemic signals (chemical and/or electrical) transported over long distances in the plant have to be postulated. Until now evidence for such signals originate mainly from observations of enhanced resistance against pathogens on leaves distant from the induction site.

Keywords

Systemic Induction Systemic Induce Resistance Fungal Development Streptomyces Griseus Challenge Infection 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Beardmore J, Ride JP, Granger, JW (1983) Cellular lignification as a factor in the HR of wheat to stem rust. Physiol Plant Pathology 22:209–220CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Bradford M (1976) A rapid and sensitive method for the quantitation of protein. Anal Biochem 72:248–254PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Conti GC, Bassi M, Maffi D, Bocci AM (1986) Host parasite relationship in a susceptible and a resistant rose cultivar inoculated with Spherotheca pannosa. J Phytopathology 117:312–320CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Eschrich W, Curri er HB (1964) Identification of callose by its diachrome and fluorochrome reactions. Stain Technology 39:303–307Google Scholar
  5. Goldberg R, Cateson AM, Czaninski Y (1983) Some properties of syringaldazine oxidase, a peroxidase specifically involved in the lignification processes. Z Pflanzenphysiol 110:267–279CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Kovats K (to be published) Comparison of systemic induced resistance of tomato and cucumber. Dissertation, University of ZurichGoogle Scholar
  7. Kuc J (1987) Plant immunization and its applicability for disease control. In: Chet I (ed) Innovative approaches to plant disease control. Wiley & Sons, New York, p 255–274Google Scholar
  8. Kuck KH, Tiburzy R, Hanssler G, Reisener HJ (1981) Vizualization of rust haustoria in wheat leaves by using fluorochromes. Physiol Plant Pathology 19:439–441CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Mauch F, Hadwiger LE, Boiler T (1984) Ethylene: Symptom, not signal for the induction of chitinase and b-l,3-glucanase in pea pods by pathogens and elicitors. Plant Physiol 76:607–611PubMedCentralPubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Vera P, Conejero V (1988) Pathogen-related proteins in tomato. Plant Physiol 87:58–63PubMedCentralPubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Andres Binder
    • 1
  • Gianni Baer
    • 1
  • Christina Hofmann
    • 1
  • Kati Kováts
    • 1
  1. 1.Maag-Roche Ltd.DielsdorfSwitzerland

Personalised recommendations