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Liver Damage after Coal-tar Treatment does not Prevent Induction of Glutathione S-Transferases in Rat Liver

  • C. T. A. Evelo
  • J. Atema
  • J. H. J. Copius-Peereboom
  • P. H. S. Fijneman
  • J. C. L. M. Pertijs
  • R. P. Bos
Conference paper
Part of the Archives of Toxicology book series (TOXICOLOGY, volume 13)

Abstract

Glutathione S-transferases are known to be susceptible to inactivation by covalent binding of reactive compounds (Jakoby and Keen 1977). When this suicide reaction occurs upon exposure of humans to reactive compounds or their precursors a diminution of GST activity in the erythrocytes and the various organs in the exposed persons is to be expected (Ansari et al 1987). In fact a decrease in GST activity was found in blood of persons exposed to hot rubber fumes (Kilpikari and Savolainen 1984). It is to be expected that an overall reduction of GST activity will limit the formation of thioethers after exposure to electrophilic compounds. Therefore, decreases in thioether excretion after prolonged work with asphalt (Lafuente and Mallol 1987) or after heavy treatment with coal-tar containing ointment (Bos and Jongeneelen 1988) also point to decreases in GST activity. The object of this study was to verify whether coal-tar treatment indeed lowers the GST activity.

Keywords

Reactive Compound Exposed Person Increase Liver Weight Prolonged Work Heavy Treatment 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Abbreviations

GST

glutathione S-transferase

GSH

glutathione

CDNB

1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene

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References

  1. Ansari GAS, SV Singh, JC Can and AC Awasthi (1987) Human erythrocyte glutathione S-transferase: a possible marker of chemical exposure. Toxicol Lett 37: 57–62PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Bos RP and FJ Jongeneelen (1988) Nonselective and selective methods for biological monitoring of exposure to coal-tar products, in Methods for detecting DNA damaging agents in humans; applications in cancer epidemiology and prevention, Bartsch (ed), IARC Scientific publication 89: 389–395Google Scholar
  3. Jacoby WB and JH Keen (1977) A triple-threat in detoxification: the glutathione S-transferases. Trends Biochem Sci 2: 229–231CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Kilpikari I and H Savolainen (1984) Decreased erythrocyte glutathione S-transferase activity in rubber workers. Int Arch Occup Environ Health 53: 299–302PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Lafuente A and J Mallol (1987) Urinary Thioethers in workers exposed to the asphalt: an impairment of glutathione S-transferase activity? J Toxicol Environm Health 21: 533–534CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. T. A. Evelo
    • 1
  • J. Atema
    • 1
  • J. H. J. Copius-Peereboom
    • 1
  • P. H. S. Fijneman
    • 1
  • J. C. L. M. Pertijs
    • 1
  • R. P. Bos
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Toxicology, Faculty of MedicineUniversity of NijmegenNijmegenThe Netherlands

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