Contribution of Extractives to Wood Characteristics

  • H. Imamura
Part of the Springer Series in Wood Science book series (SSWOO)

Abstract

The major components of wood are cellulose, hemicelluloses, and lignin, and many of the properties of wood are a function of this lignocellulosic network. Although extractives are a minor component, often constituting less than 10% of the wood, they contribute disproportionately to the characteristics of wood. It is extractives that give wood its color, its odor, and, to some extent, its physical properties. Extractives can have a significant influence on how wood is used.

Keywords

Lignin Monoterpene Linalool Sesquiterpene Geraniol 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1989

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  • H. Imamura

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