Synaptic Transmission in the Mechano- and Electroreceptors of the Acousticolateral System

  • G. N. Akoev
  • G. N. Andrianov
Part of the Progress in Sensory Physiology book series (PHYSIOLOGY, volume 9)

Abstract

The acousticolateral system of vertebrates includes the lateral-line organs, vestibular apparatus, and cochlea. Integration of these organs into a single system is based on the similarity of their functional and morphological characteristics, innervation, and embryonal development. The specialized receptors for the perception of weak electric fields in the lateral-line organs of some lower aquatic vertebrates may also be considered part of the acousticolateral system.

Keywords

Dopamine Serotonin Histamine Glutamine Fibril 

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin · Heidelberg 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. N. Akoev
    • 1
  • G. N. Andrianov
    • 1
  1. 1.Pavlov Institute of PhysiologyAcademy of SciencesLeningradUSSR

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