Genetic Linkage Analysis in Early-Onset Familial Alzheimer’s Dementia

  • C. Van Broeckhoven
  • H. Backhovens
  • W. Van Hul
  • G. Van Camp
  • P. Stinissen
  • A. Wehnert
  • P. Raeymaekers
  • G. De Winter
  • M. Bruyland
  • J. Gheuens
  • J. J. Martin
  • A. Vandenberghe
Conference paper

Abstract

At least 50% of all patients with senile dementia are clinically diagnosed having Alzheimer’s disease (AD; Terry and Katzman 1983). At autopsy, AD is confirmed by the large abundance of senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in the brain, particularly in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex (Brun 1983). In as many as 40% of these AD patients there is strong evidence of a previous family history of the disease, indicating that a genetic predisposing factor is involved in this neurodegenerative disorder (Davies 1986; Fitch et al. 1988). In some families the disease segregates according to a clear autosomal dominant inheritance pattern (Davies 1986; Bird et al. 1988). Although there are large variations in age at onset of disease symptoms, duration of the illness, and clinical manifestation of the disease among these families, genetic linkage analysis of the pedigrees with polymorphic DNA markers may be helpful to localize the primary defect responsible for the disease in the families (Davies 1986; Botstein et al. 1980).

Keywords

Recombination Dementia Electrophoresis Sorbi 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. Van Broeckhoven
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • H. Backhovens
  • W. Van Hul
  • G. Van Camp
  • P. Stinissen
  • A. Wehnert
  • P. Raeymaekers
  • G. De Winter
  • M. Bruyland
  • J. Gheuens
  • J. J. Martin
  • A. Vandenberghe
  1. 1.Department of BiochemistryUniversity of Antwerp (U.I.A.)AntwerpenBelgium
  2. 2.Department of NeurologyUniversity of Antwerp (U.I.A.)AntwerpenBelgium
  3. 3.Department of InnogeneticsGentBelgium

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