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Activation of Human Monocytes by the Neuropeptide Substance P and by Immune Interferon-γ: Evidence of Different Mechanisms

  • F. J. Wiedermann
  • C. J. Wiedermann
  • M. Herold
  • D. Geissler
  • G. Konwalinka
  • H. Braunsteiner
Conference paper

Abstract

The sources of inflammatory and immunomodulatory mediators are remarkably diverse. Of interest with regard to the pathophysiology of several inflammatory diseases is evidence that the peripheral terminals of primary afferent nociceptors are activated by noxious stimuli not only to produce pain but also to release proinflammatory mediators (Holzer 1988). One such mediator is substance P (SP), an undecapeptide from the tachykinin family of peptides. The significance of the antidromic release of SP from peripheral terminals into surrounding tissues is supported by the detection of increased levels of SP in inflammed tissues in patients (Pernow 1987).

Keywords

Human Monocyte Guanosine Triphosphate Peripheral Terminal Primary Afferent Nociceptors Urinary Neopterin 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • F. J. Wiedermann
    • 1
  • C. J. Wiedermann
    • 1
  • M. Herold
    • 2
  • D. Geissler
    • 3
  • G. Konwalinka
    • 3
  • H. Braunsteiner
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Laboratory of Neuroimmunology, Department of Internal MedicineUniversity of Innsbruck School of MedicineInnsbruckAustria
  2. 2.Laboratory of Rheumatology, Department of Internal MedicineUniversity of Innsbruck School of MedicineInnsbruckAustria
  3. 3.Laboratory of Experimental Hematology, Department of Internal MedicineUniversity of Innsbruck School of MedicineInnsbruckAustria

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