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Relationship of Intracranial Pressure Changes to CT Changes in Children

  • S. S. Kasoff
  • A. S. Mednick
  • D. Leslie
  • M. Tenner
  • P. Sane
  • J. Mangiardi
  • T. A. Lansen
Conference paper

Abstract

Several studies have been published that attempted to determine if any correlations exist between elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) (Lobato et al. 1979; Narayan et al. 1982), as occurs in acute head trauma, and morphological changes in the brain, as determined by examining computed tomography scans (CTs) (Sadhu et al. 1979; Fasol et al. 1980; Haar et al. 1980; Papo et al. 1980). These studies, however, examined primarily adult head trauma. Thus, the purpose of this study was to determine if such correlations exist between ICP and CT in pediatric head trauma. We sought to correlate changes on the initial CTs of children that could serve as reliable predictors of raised intracranial pressure.

Keywords

Intracranial Pressure Severe Head Injury Midline Shift Closed Head Injury Sulcal Effacement 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. S. Kasoff
    • 1
  • A. S. Mednick
    • 1
  • D. Leslie
    • 2
  • M. Tenner
    • 2
  • P. Sane
    • 2
  • J. Mangiardi
    • 1
  • T. A. Lansen
    • 1
  1. 1.Departments of NeurosurgeryNew York Medical CollegeValhallaUSA
  2. 2.Departments of RadiologyNew York Medical CollegeValhallaUSA

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