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Continuous Monitoring of Middle Cerebral Arterial Blood Velocity and Cerebral Perfusion Pressure

  • T. Lundar
  • K.-F. Lindegaard
  • H. Nornes

Abstract

Intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring has been used clinically for over 30 years, providing an understanding of the ICP dynamics in clinical situations. With the addition of systemic artery blood pressure (BP) recordings, continuous monitoring of the cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP), which is estimated by subtracting the ICP from the BP, is now a standard method in the management of critically ill neurosurgical patients. In the individual patient, CPP monitoring yields prognostic information and may be helpful when evaluating different treatment modalities.

Keywords

Cerebral Perfusion Pressure Blood Velocity Epidural Pressure Middle Cerebral Artery Blood Flow Cerebral Circulatory Arrest 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. Lundar
    • 1
  • K.-F. Lindegaard
    • 1
  • H. Nornes
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Neurosurgery, RikshospitaletThe National Hospital, University of OsloOsloNorway

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