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Cerebral Hemodynamics in Benign Intracranial Hypertension Studied with PET

  • L. Junck
Conference paper

Abstract

The pathogenesis of benign intracranial hypertension (BIH) remains poorly understood. Many investigators suspect the disorder to be caused by obstruction of CSF outflow at the arachnoid villi (Johnston 1973), but this same mechanism is also suspected to cause an entirely different syndrome, normal pressure hydrocephalus. In 1985, I proposed that BIH might be caused be weakness in the walls of the dural venous sinuses, resulting in compression of the venous sinuses, partial venous outflow obstruction, and elevated ICP (Junck 1986).

Keywords

Cerebral Blood Flow Lumbar Puncture Cerebral Perfusion Pressure Cerebral Blood Volume Venous Sinus 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. Alpert NM, Eriksson L, Chang JY, Bergstrom M, Litton JE, Correia JA, Bohm C, Ackerman RH, Taveras JM (1984) Strategy for the measurement of regional cerebral blood flow using short lived tracers and positron emission tomography. J Cereb Blood Flow Metab 4: 28–34PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Johnston I (1973) Reduced C.S.F. absorption syndrome. Reappraisal of benign intracranial hypertension and related conditions. Lancet II: 418–420CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Junck L (1986) Benign intracranial hypertension and normal pressure hydrocephalus: Theoretical conditions. In: Miller JD, Teasdale GM, Rowan JO, Galbraith SL, Mendelow AD (eds) Intracranial pressure VI. Springer, Berlin Heidelberg New York Tokyo, pp 447–450Google Scholar
  4. Shapiro A (1977) Steady flow in collapsible tubes. J Biomech Eng 99: 126–147CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • L. Junck
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of NeurologyUniversity of MichiganAnn ArborUSA

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