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Allopurinol and Dimethylthiourea Limit Infarct Size in Partial Ischemia

  • R. D. Martz
  • G. Rayos
  • G. P. Schielke
  • A. L. Betz
Conference paper

Abstract

Toxic oxygen metabolites such as superoxide and hydrogen peroxide are produced as a normal part of cellular metabolism. These compounds, as well as their breakdown products, may act to injury the macromolecular components of the cellular cytoplasm and membrane. Under normal circumstances, adequate intracellular defense mechanisms are present to neutralize these toxic species. However, in settings of tissue ischemia, these buffers may be used up, allowing direct attack of free radicals on cellular constituents. This interaction can result in cell injury and death.

Keywords

Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion Xanthine Oxidase Xanthine Oxidase Activity Nervous System Disorder Xanthine Oxidase System 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. D. Martz
    • 1
  • G. Rayos
    • 1
  • G. P. Schielke
    • 1
  • A. L. Betz
    • 2
  1. 1.Departments of SurgeryAnn ArborUSA
  2. 2.Pediatrics and NeurologyUniversity of MichiganAnn ArborUSA

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