Effects On Intracranial Pressure In a Clinically Derived Fluid Resuscitation Protocol Following Hemorrhagic Shock with an Accompanying Intracranial Mass

  • J. M. Whitley
  • D. S. Prough
  • D. D. Deal
  • A. K. Lamb
  • D. S. DeWitt
Conference paper

Abstract

We have previously shown, in a hemorrhagic shock — intracranial mass model, that isotonic crystalloid results in a greater and more rapid increase in ICP immediately following resuscitation than hypertonic crystalloid, colloid or a combination of crystalloid and colloid (Whitley 1988). This rapid increase in ICP may exacerbate the neurological sequelae of the shock episode by decreasing CBF following resuscitation. While the effects of resuscitation on ICP have been extensively studied, they have dealt only with the effects of a single resuscitation fluid bolus, unlike the clinical protocol where systemic hemodynamics are maintained. The present study compared the cerebrovascular effects of resuscitation with isotonic and hypertonic crystalloid, each with and without colloid (10% Pentastarch), while maintaining cardiac output above baseline levels in a hemorrhagic shock — intracranial mass model.

Keywords

Catheter Starch Penta Thiopental T125 

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References

  1. Rapela C, Green H (1964) Autoregulation of canine cerebral blood flow. Circ Res [Suppl] 15:205–212PubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. Whitley JM, Prough DS, DeWitt DS (1988) Shock plus an intracranial mass in dogs: Cerebrovascular effects of resuscitation fluid choices. Anesth Analg 67:259CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. M. Whitley
    • 1
  • D. S. Prough
    • 1
  • D. D. Deal
    • 1
  • A. K. Lamb
    • 1
  • D. S. DeWitt
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Anesthesia, Section on Critical CareWake Forest University Medical CenterWinston-SalemUSA

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