Pressure Waves and Brain Stem Microcirculatory Disturbance Following Experimental Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

  • M. Hashimoto
  • S. Higashi
  • Y. Kogure
  • H. Fujii
  • T. Yamashima
  • K. Tokuda
  • H. Ito
  • S. Yamamoto
Conference paper

Abstract

In a study of the intraventricular fluid pressure of patients with intracranial hypertension, Lundberg (1960) was able to distinguish three main forms of pressure waves. These waves that were seen generally in the process of secondary intracranial hypertension may be regarded as a pathophysiological basis of acute disorders of brain stem in patients with increased intracranial pressure (ICP). We have developed an experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) model in which the pressure waves resemble those seen in clinical patients. The present study was performed to examine the relationship between acute intracranial hypertension and the topography of impaired microvascular perfusion of brain stem with special attention to the pathogenesis of pressure waves

Keywords

Catheter Ischemia Bromide Respiration Weinstein 

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Hashimoto
    • 1
  • S. Higashi
    • 1
  • Y. Kogure
    • 1
  • H. Fujii
    • 1
  • T. Yamashima
    • 1
  • K. Tokuda
    • 1
  • H. Ito
    • 1
  • S. Yamamoto
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Neurosurgery, School of MedicineUniversity of KanazawaKanazawa City 920Japan

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