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Ion Fluxes and Cell Swelling in Experimental Traumatic Brain Injury: The Role of Excitatory Amino Acids

  • Y. Katayama
  • M. K. Cheung
  • A. Alves
  • D. P. Becker

Abstract

Several earlier studies have demonstrated, using ion-sensitive electrodes, that massive ionic fluxes across the brain cell membrane occur in response to traumatic brain injury even when the cell membrane is not primarily damaged (Takahashi et al. 1981, Tsubokawa 1983, Hubschman and Kornhauser 1983, DeSalles et al. 1986). However, no data are currently available regarding the exact mechanism of such ionic events. Similar changes in ionic distribution in anoxic or ischemic brain injury have been shown to produce cellular swelling as a direct consequence (Van Harreveld and Ochs 1956, Hansen et al. 1980). While the occurrence of cellular swelling in traumatie brain injury is not well documented to date, the massive ionic fluxes are likely to result in changes in cell volume regardless of their cause. Therefore, understanding these phenomena would provide insight into the intraparenchymal pathology seen clinieally in traumatic brain injury.

Keywords

Traumatic Brain Injury Excitatory Amino Acid Ischemic Brain Injury KYNURENIC Acid Transient Cerebral Ischemia 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Y. Katayama
    • 1
  • M. K. Cheung
    • 1
  • A. Alves
    • 1
  • D. P. Becker
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Neurosurgery, School of MedicineUniversity of California at Los AngelesLos AngelesUSA

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