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ICP Reduction by Lidocaine: Dose Response Curve and Effect on CBF and EEG

  • M. Khayata
  • E. Arbit
  • G. R. DiResta
  • N. Lau
  • J. H. Galicich
Conference paper

Abstract

Management of elevated intracranial pressure is a common problem in neurosurgical patients presenting with a mass effect due to tumors, hemorrhage, or hydrocephalus. There are cases where intracranial hypertension persists despite conventional therapy. There are also circumstances where rapid control of the ICP is needed without the delay of onset required by some of the presently available agents. Most of the presently acutely used agents (i.e. mannitol, hyperventilation) act through their effect on reducing cerebral blood volume.

Keywords

Mean Arterial Pressure Intracranial Hypertension Cerebral Blood Volume Elevated Intracranial Pressure Cerebral Metabolic Rate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Khayata
    • 1
  • E. Arbit
    • 1
  • G. R. DiResta
    • 1
  • N. Lau
    • 1
  • J. H. Galicich
    • 1
  1. 1.Neurosurgical Research Laboratory, Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer CenterCornell University Medical CollegeNew York CityUSA

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