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Split Brain Surgically Performed in Developing and in Adult Cats: Physiological Properties and Recovery of Visual Cortex Neurons

  • U. Yinon
  • M. Chen
Conference paper

Abstract

Physiologically, several different experimental approaches have been so far adopted in order to demonstrate the involvement of visual cortex cells in interhemispheric relationships. Of these approaches the main ones will be briefly described here.

Keywords

Corpus Callosum Visual Cortex Cortical Cell Optic Chiasm Ocular Dominance 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • U. Yinon
    • 1
  • M. Chen
    • 1
  1. 1.Physiological Laboratory, Maurice and Gabriela Goldschleger Eye Research InstituteTel-Aviv University Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Chaim Sheba Medical CenterTel-HashomerIsrael

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