Foliage Plants

  • Dattajirao K. Salunkhe
  • Narayana R. Bhat
  • Babasaheb B. Desai

Abstract

The term foliage plants has been used in many ways by several scientists. The diverse nature of the plants included in this group makes it difficult to define the term precisely. Bailey and Bailey [1] used this term to designate plants that are grown primarily for their foliage rather than for flowers. Due to the diverse nature of growth habit and the parts of special interest, there is no single definition of foliage plants which encompasses both these aspects. A recent definition developed by Conover [2] is currently being used in the foliage industry. According to this definition, foliage plants include all the plants grown primarily for their foliage and utilized for interior decoration or interior landscape purposes. The flowers, if present, are inconspicuous and are relatively of secondary importance. Table 11.1 gives the important plant species, including the varieties used for indoor decoration. The importance of foliage plants has increased many folds in the recent past [33, 34].

Keywords

Toxicity Chlorophyll Urea Carbohydrate Shipping 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dattajirao K. Salunkhe
    • 1
  • Narayana R. Bhat
    • 1
  • Babasaheb B. Desai
    • 1
  1. 1.Mahatma Phule Agriculture UniversityRahuri District Ahmednagar (M.S.)India

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