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Effects of Oral Contraception on Blood Clotting

  • J. Bonnar
  • L. Daly
  • A. Sabra
  • A. Carroll

Abstract

The major health hazard encountered in relation to fertility control with oral contraception is the occurrence of vascular complications. Epidemiological evidence from Europe and the United States has shown that estrogen/progestogen oral contraceptives increase the relative risk of thromboembolic complications. These hazards arise especially in association with older age of women, with smoking and also to some extent with prolonged usage of oral contraceptives containing 50 μg or more of estrogen. The main vascular complications are venous thromboembolic disease, myocardial infarction and both hemorrhagic and thrombotic stroke [1, 2]. These findings are from countries in which the incidence of vascular disease is high and may not be relevant to countries in which these diseases have a low incidence. Differences in coagulation tests are known to occur in different ethnic groups and geographic locations [3].

Keywords

Oral Contraceptive Fibrinolytic Activity Thromboembolic Complication Oral Contraception Coagulation Inhibitor 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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    Bocaz J A, Barja P, Bonnar J et al. (1986) Differences in coagulation and haemostatic parameters in normal women of childbearing age from different ethnic groups and geographic locations. Task force on oral contraceptives — WHO programme of research, development and research training in human reproduction. Thromb Haemost 55(3):390–395PubMedGoogle Scholar
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    Meade TW, Haines AP, North WRS, Charkabarti R, Howarth DJ, Stirling Y (1977) Haemostatic, lipid and blood pressure profiles of women on oral contraceptives containing 50 mcg or 30 mcg estrogen. Lancet 2:948–951PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Bonnar
    • 1
  • L. Daly
    • 1
  • A. Sabra
    • 1
  • A. Carroll
    • 1
  1. 1.Trinity College, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of DublinSt. James’s HospitalDublin 8Ireland

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