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General Use Immunizations for Travelers

  • S. R. Preblud
  • E. W. Brink
  • W. A. Orenstein

Summary

Immunizations for travelers can be divided into two categories: those required solely by various country regulations (cholera and yellow fever vaccines), and those recommended specifically for the health and well-being of the traveler. Some immunizations in the second category are recommended only under special circumstances (e.g., typhoid, meningococcal, Japanese encephalitis, and yellow fever vaccines). Others are recommended on a more routine basis since they are included in the routine immunization schedule of a particular country. The latter are “general-use” immunizations and include diphtheria and tetanus toxoids and pertussis vaccine (DTP); pediatric and adult diphtheria and tetanus toxoids (DT and Td, respectively); and measles and polio vaccines. Rubella, BCG, and mumps vaccines may also be included in this classification. In contrast with many other travel-related immunizations, recommendations for these “general-use” immunizations are relatively straightforward. They are usually indicated for any traveler who does not have documented immunity, provided there are no contraindications to their administration. The issues most frequently raised regarding administration of the “general-use” immunizations include (1) the criteria for immunity, (2) the simultaneous administration of these and other immunizations, (3) the minimum interval required between doses when departure necessitates an accelerated immunization schedule, and (4) the minimum age at which they can be administered to infants. As the number of international travelers increases, and as countries strive both to safeguard the health of travelers and to limit the importation and spread of vaccine-preventable diseases, attention to these “general-use” immunizations becomes increasingly important.

Keywords

Tetanus Toxoid Pertussis Vaccine Measle Vaccine Polysaccharide Vaccine Oral Polio Vaccine 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. R. Preblud
  • E. W. Brink
  • W. A. Orenstein

There are no affiliations available

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