Brain Development and Self-Organization

  • W. Singer
  • Chr. v.d. Malsburg
Conference paper
Part of the Springer Series in Synergetics book series (SSSYN, volume 39)

Abstract

The encephalization which accompanies the phylogenetic emergence of mammals has led to a dramatic increase of nerve cells and nervous connections that exceeds by far the disproportionally small increase of the genom. This implies that the information stored in the genom cannot alone suffice to specify the connectivity of higher nervous systems. The following numbers illustrate the magnitude of the specification problems that have to be solved during brain development.

Keywords

Crystallization Convection Expense Lamination Chol 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. Singer
    • 1
  • Chr. v.d. Malsburg
    • 2
  1. 1.Max-Planck-Institut für HirnforschungFrankfurt 71Fed.Rep.of Germany
  2. 2.Max-Planck-Institut für Biophysikalische ChemieGöttingen-NikolausbergFed.Rep.of Germany

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