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Regeneration of Plants from Protoplasts of Lettuce and its Wild Species

  • S. Enomoto
  • K. Ohyama
Part of the Biotechnology in Agriculture and Forestry book series (AGRICULTURE, volume 8)

Abstract

Cultivated species of lettuce originated in inland areas of Asia Minor in the Middle and Near East, and its wild (sibling) species are distributed world-wide. Lettuce, including many cultivated species, belongs to the family Compositae and is classified into five types: head lettuce, leaf bunching lettuce, cos or romaine lettuce, cos type and stem lettuce. Lettuce has 2n= 18 chromosomes, except for some artificially bred tetraploid varieties. Breeding of a disease-resistant variety is one of the most important aims to be achieved with regard to lettuce cultivation. Typical diseases in lettuce include microbial diseases such as Sclerotinia rot, drop, grey mould, bacterial soft rot and root rot, viral diseases such as Mosaic Virus (LMV, CMV) and Lettuce Big Vein and microplasma diseases such as Yellows. On the other hand, the existence of several wild species of lettuce resistant to Turnip Mosaic Virus (TMV), CMV, downy mildow pathogen, etc., has been reported (Netzer et al. 1976; Prrovdenti et al. 1980).

Keywords

Naphthalene Acetic Acid Protoplast Culture Turnip Mosaic Virus Head Lettuce Indol Acetic Acid 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Enomoto
  • K. Ohyama
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Cell BiologyNational Institute of Agrobiological ResourcesTsukuba Ibaraki 305Japan

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