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Direct Antitumor Effects of an LH-RH Agonist

  • J. A. Foekens
  • J. G. M. Klijn
Conference paper

Abstract

Chronic administration of potent long-acting luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LH-RH) agonists to patients in sufficiently high doses causes a chemical castration through suppression of the pituitary-gonadal axis. This therapy appears effective in the treatment of hormone-dependent tumors, such as breast and prostate cancer (for updated results, see the chapters in this volume).

Keywords

Direct Antitumor Effect Direct Antitumor Action Specific Secretory Protein Postmenopausal Metastatic Breast Cancer Postmenopausal Metastatic Breast Cancer Patient 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. A. Foekens
  • J. G. M. Klijn

There are no affiliations available

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