Use of Plasma Exchange in Thermally Injured Patients

  • G. D. Warden
Conference paper

Abstract

Major thermal injuries produce pathophysiologic changes in the external and internal systems of the body, the initial life-threatening alterations occurring in the internal environment. Numerous reports, beginning with the cross-circulation studies of Baxter and Shires [1] in 1968, suggest that serum from thermally injured patients has “factors” that alter cellular function. Although these factors remain to be identified, it is obvious from studies on cellular function that placing dysfunctional cells (usually leukocytes of lymphocytes) into a normal environment such as donor whole blood or fresh frozen plasma generally returns the particular function to normal [2–5].

Keywords

Catheter Depression Lactate Cortisol Serotonin 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag, Berlin Heidelberg 1989

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  • G. D. Warden

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