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The contribution of drilling to British deep geology

  • A. Whittaker
Conference paper
Part of the Exploration of the Deep Continental Crust book series (EXPLORATION)

Abstract

The increasing international activity in the field of scientific drilling of the continents, and the establishment of a UK Working Group looking into the feasibility of a British programme, prompt this note on the contribution of drilling to British deep geology.

Keywords

Drill Stem Jurassic Rock British Geological Survey Geol Surv Maximum Horizontal Stress 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Whittaker
    • 1
  1. 1.Deep Geology Research GroupBritish Geological SurveyKeyworth, NottinghamUK

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