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Role of Prostaglandins in Intestinal Fluid Secretion

  • E. Beubler
Conference paper

Abstract

In the late 1960s endogenous prostaglandins (PGs) were assumed to be related to certain types of human diarrhea, diarrhea being one of the most prominent side effects associated with the clinical use of PGE and PGE Meanwhile, secretory as well as motor functions have been shown to be involved in PG-induced diarrhea. Despite the well documented effects of PGs on intestinal smooth muscle, which may partly contribute to diarrhea and particularly to the abdominal colics that accompany it, the probably more important properties are those responsible for intestinal secretion.

Keywords

Adenylate Cyclase Cholera Toxin Morphine Withdrawal Intestinal Secretion Intestinal Smooth Muscle 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. Beubler

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