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Chalaza-Micropyle Element Concentration Gradients in the Endosperm Tissue During Embryogenesis

  • M. Ryczkowski
  • W. Reczyński
Conference paper

Abstract

Ovules of Haemanthus Katharinae Bak. were used as experimental material. Quantitative determinations of concentration of K, Na, Ca, Mg, Fe, Mn, Zn and Cu in the micropylar and chalazal parts of the endosperm tissue during exponential phase of embryo growth were made using the atomic absorption spectrophotometer (Perkin-Elmer, Model 503,. It has been established that: a. there are distinct chalaza-micropyle concentration (μg/g fr wt) gradients of elements (K, Ca, Mg, Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu) in the endosperm tissue, b. the elongation of the embryo proceedes from the micropylar to the chalazal end of the ovule i.e. in the direction opposite to that of the chalaza-micropyle element concentration gradients in the endosperm tissue, c. generally concentrations of all determined elements increase in the endosperm tissue during embryo growth, d. it is suggested that during proembryo stage there are also some chalaza-micropyle element concentration gradients in the endosperm tissue.

Keywords

Embryo Growth Endosperm Tissue Physiological Gradient Chalazal Part Proembryo Stage 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Ryczkowski
    • 1
  • W. Reczyński
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Molecular BiologyJagiellonian UniversityCracowPoland

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