MK-801 Prevents the Induction of Long-Term Potentiation

  • E. J. Coan
  • W. Saywood
  • G. L. Collingridge
Conference paper

Abstract

The effects of the pre-incubation of hippocampal slices with MK-801 was examined on synaptic events in the Schaffer collateral-commissural pathway. Treatments which blocked NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic responses also prevented the induction of long term potentiation.

Keywords

Magnesium Depression NMDA Ketamine Haas 

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. J. Coan
    • 1
  • W. Saywood
    • 1
  • G. L. Collingridge
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PharmacologyUniversity of BristolBristolUK

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