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Phytotoxic Effects and Phytoalexin-Elicitor Activity of Microbial Pectic Enzymes

  • F. Cervone
  • G. De Lorenzo
  • R. D’Ovidio
  • M. G. Hahn
  • Y. Ito
  • A. Darvill
  • P. Albersheim
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (volume 27)

Abstract

Microbial pectic enzymes not only macerate plant tissue but also kill plant cells and elicit synthesis and accumulation of phytoalexins (Hahn et al., 1988). We have evidence suggesting that these three physiological activities of pectic enzymes may be regulated by factors such as endo-polygalacturonase inhibiting proteins (PGIP) and pH.

Keywords

Plant Cell Wall Evans Blue Galacturonic Acid Killing Activity Fusarium Moniliforme 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • F. Cervone
    • 1
    • 2
  • G. De Lorenzo
    • 1
    • 2
  • R. D’Ovidio
    • 1
    • 2
  • M. G. Hahn
    • 2
  • Y. Ito
    • 2
  • A. Darvill
    • 2
  • P. Albersheim
    • 2
  1. 1.Dipartimento di Biologia VegetaleUniversità di Roma “La Sapienza”RomeItaly
  2. 2.Complex Carbohydrate Research CenterUniversity of GeorgiaAthensUSA

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