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Host Colonization and Pathogenesis in Plant Diseases Caused by Fastidious Xylem-Inhabiting Bacteria

  • M. J. Davis
Conference paper
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (volume 28)

Abstract

The diversity of plant pathogenic bacteria capable of colonizing plant xylem is astounding. They are represented in almost every genus containing bacterial plant pathogens and incite diseases characterized by symptoms such as wilts, cankers, soft rots, leaf spots, galls, blights, declines, stunts, and leaf marginal necroses (Hayward 1974; Van Alfen 1982). Included among these xylem colonizers are bacteria with exacting nutritional and physiological requirements for growth as evidenced by their inability to grow in vitro on media commonly used for cultivation of plant pathogenic bacteria (Davis et al 1981). These bacteria are collectively referred to as fastidious xylem-inhabiting bacteria (FXB).

Keywords

Tracheary Element Sugarcane Cultivar Plant Pathogenic Bacterium Peach Tree Ratoon Stunting Disease 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. J. Davis
    • 1
  1. 1.Fort Lauderdale Research and Education Center, Institute of Food and Agricultural SciencesUniversity of FloridaFort LauderdaleUSA

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