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Adaptive Changes in an Animal Model of Micro-Encephaly

  • F. Cattabeni
  • D. Cocchi
  • M. Cimino
  • M. Di Luca
  • L. Mennuni
  • P. Zaratin
  • M. P. Abbracchio
Conference paper
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (volume 22)

Abstract

As a result of pre-natal or early post-natal exposure to a variety of agents (viruses, irradiation and cytotoxins) humans may develop microencephaly, characterized by reduction of brain size (Crome & Stern, 1967), with different involvement of selective brain regions depending on the type of agent and duration of exposure. Since neurons in different brain areas undergo their final division at quite distinct times during C.N.S. development, interference with neurogenesis will result in different kinds of brain lesions, strictly depending upon time of the insult, being actively dividing cells more affected than differentiated neurons. This mechanism is at the base of the neuronal lesions induced perinatally by cytotoxic agents such as hydroxy-urea, 5-azacytidine and methyl-azoxy-methanol acetate (MAM), which selectively interfere with DNA synthesis (Jonhston & Coyle, 1982). As a consequence of these lesions, the developing and maturing brain seems to undergo a series of adaptive changes not yet fully characterized, and whose consequences are totally unknown.

Keywords

Passive Avoidance Passive Avoidance Test Antimitotic Agent Final Division Striatal Tyrosine Hydroxylase 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • F. Cattabeni
    • 1
  • D. Cocchi
    • 2
  • M. Cimino
    • 1
  • M. Di Luca
    • 1
  • L. Mennuni
    • 1
  • P. Zaratin
    • 1
  • M. P. Abbracchio
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Pharmacological Sciences, School of PharmacyUniversity of MilanoItaly
  2. 2.Department of Pharmacology, School of MedicineUniversity of MilanoItaly

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