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In Vivo and In Vitro Assessment of Vancomycin-Induced Nephrotoxicity

  • W. R. Hewitt
  • P. J. Bugelski
  • A. C. Silver
  • A. Klinkner
  • D. G. Morgan
Part of the Archives of Toxicology book series (TOXICOLOGY, volume 12)

Abstract

Vancomycin (VAN), a glycopeptide antibiotic introduced into clinical use in 1956, is effective against a variety of gram-positive organisms but has been associated with renal impairment in a small proportion of patients. Farber and Moellering (1983) estimated that 5% of patients treated with VAN alone exhibited signs of renal impairment whereas 35% of patients receiving VAN concurrently with an aminoglycoside were so affected, suggesting that these antibiotics may act synergistically in producing renal dysfunction. In a report of 50 patients, Sorrell and Collignon (1985) described four with renal dysfunction who received concomitant therapy with VAN and an aminoglycoside for at least 4 days. Twenty-four patients treated with VAN in combination with an aminoglycoside and 12 patients treated with VAN alone showed no signs of renal dysfunction.

Keywords

Kidney Weight Glycopeptide Antibiotic Nephrotoxic Potential Proximal Tubular Dysfunction Blood Urea Nitrogen Concentration 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. R. Hewitt
    • 1
  • P. J. Bugelski
    • 1
  • A. C. Silver
    • 1
  • A. Klinkner
    • 1
  • D. G. Morgan
    • 1
  1. 1.Smith, Kline and French Laboratories PathologyDepartments of Investigative Toxicology and ExperimentalPhiladelphiaUSA

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