Can a jejunal loop offer more resistance to acidity?

  • A. Sicular
  • M. Mignon
  • F. Ratineau
Conference paper

Abstract

When loss of anti-reflux function between the esophagus and the stomach occurs from destruction of the distal esophagus by ulceration, fibrosis or perforation, the ability to construct a competent valve surgically (Nissen, Hill or Belsey), is lost. In these cases, interposition reproduces a structure that prevents reflux acid burn of the distal esophagus. Human colon and jejunal segments are available. In my opinion, based on the literature and my own experience, the jejunal loop will offer a uniquely better resistance to esophageal acidity if properly interposed between the esophagus and the stomach. The basis for this rests on anatomic, radiographic and physiologic phenomena.

Keywords

Acidity Barium Histamine Perforation Esophagitis 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Sicular
    • 1
  • M. Mignon
    • 2
  • F. Ratineau
    • 2
  1. 1.New YorkUSA
  2. 2.ParisFrance

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