What is the incidence of reflux in achalasia?

  • G. Cargill
  • M. Duché
  • K. Jeyasingham
  • H. R. J. Payne
Conference paper

Abstract

Achalasia is defined as a lack of relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES). Esophageal manometry is the best test for the diagnosis of this disorder, which is found in many diseases: achalasia (megaesophagus), scleroderma, lupus, amylosis, dysautonomia, neoplasic syndroms; sphincter immaturity and iatrogenic achalasia after a Nissen procedure for example.

Keywords

Nicotine Luminal Nifedipine Diltiazem Esophagitis 

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. Cargill
    • 1
  • M. Duché
    • 1
  • K. Jeyasingham
    • 2
  • H. R. J. Payne
    • 2
  1. 1.ParisFrance
  2. 2.BristolUK

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