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Population Genetics

  • Klaus Wöhrmann
  • Volker Loeschcke
Conference paper
Part of the Progress in Botany/Fortschritte der Botanik book series (BOTANY, volume 49)

Abstract

During the last years rapid development has occurred in two fields of population genetics. New techniques in molecular biology made data available in prokaryotes and eukaryotes which could be analyzed at the population level. After about 20 years of enzyme variability research interest switched to DNA sequence variation, its origin and change within and between populations. The new techniques led to the discovery of interrupted genes, pseudogenes, transposed elements, nonhomologous recombination, sequence expansions and multigene families. This new information needs interpretation and incorporation into our knowledge about evolution.

Keywords

Transposable Element Population Genetic Multigene Family Adaptive Evolution Pearl Millet 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Klaus Wöhrmann
    • 1
  • Volker Loeschcke
    • 2
  1. 1.Institut für Biologie IIUniversität TübingenTübingen 1Germany
  2. 2.Institute of Ecology and GeneticsUniversity of AarhusAarhus CDenmark

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