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Towards an Anatomy of Academic Discourse: Meaning and Context in the Undergraduate Essay

Chapter
Part of the Springer Series in Language and Communication book series (SSLAN, volume 23)

Abstract

First Class Answers in History (Bennett, 1974) is a collection of reflections by seven Cambridge tutors on the characteristics of outstanding essay answers in the University’s final examinations. In his editorial introduction to the volume, Bennett demolishes the notion that there is any “hidden mystery about good history writing” (p. 6). He contends:

Excellence in historical writing consists of simple and solid virtues, not of facile tricks and gaudy gadgets. It can therefore be appreciated by all who have the wit and the diligence to seek it; it is no monopoly of those who possess superior talents (1974, p.2).

Keywords

Academic Discourse Historical Writing Tacit Dimension Class Answer History Essay 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1988

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