Nd: YAG Laser with Water Jet Stream — A New Transmission System with a Water-Guided Laser Beam

  • R. Sander
  • H. Poesl
  • F. Frank
  • P. Meister
  • M. Strobel
  • A. Spuhler
  • E. Unsoeld
Conference paper

Abstract

The transmission of laser light via flexible transmission systems is the prerequisite for the fiberendoscopic use of lasers in gastroenterology. Among the lasers that meet the necessary conditions, the Neodymium YAG laser has become widely accepted on account of its specific physical properties (1). Recently, changes in pulse quality, wavelength, and transmission system (2–6), have opened up the way to new forms of application. In the case of the Neodymium YAG laser, light is released either in the pulsed or continuous wave mode. For the pulsed laser, the wavelength 1.06 microns is always employed, while for the continuous wave laser (cw), two wavelengths are al present in use: 1.06 microns, and 1.32 microns. Light can be transmitted with or without contact with the tissue. The contact methods are differentiated in accordance with the material of the tip of the light guide. In the case of the non-contact procedures, a differentiation is made between fibers with coaxial CO2 flow, and those with water flow.

Keywords

Burning Quartz Adenocarcinoma Adenoma Shrinkage 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin, Heidelberg 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. Sander
    • 1
  • H. Poesl
    • 1
  • F. Frank
    • 1
  • P. Meister
    • 1
  • M. Strobel
    • 1
  • A. Spuhler
    • 1
  • E. Unsoeld
    • 1
  1. 1.I. Medizinische AbteilungStädtisches Klinikum München HarlachingMünchen 90Germany

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