CO2 Laser Microsurgery for Skin Lesions

  • G. Bandieramonte
  • O. Santoro
  • P. Lepera
  • G. Fava
  • G. De Palo
Conference paper

Abstract

A series of 52 malignant and 310 benign skin lesions was selected for laser microsurgery from Jan. 1982 to Dec. 1985. Epithelial (13.3%), pigmented (17.2%) soft tissue (32.1%), pseudotumoral (33.1%) and inflammatory lesions (4.4%) were located on the face (58%), scalp (5%), extremities (10.2%), trunk or limbs (16%) and perianal area (10.5%). CO2 laser models used were Valfivre LSS 25, Coherent 450, and Cooper 250 Z coupled with the ZEISS OPMI-6 operating microscope (focal lens 200 mm). Laser systems were used at 10 to 15 W, CW and superpulsed emission spot size was 0.5 to 1.5 mm. Resection was used in 58% of cases, vaporization or combined procedure were used in the remaining cases. Of the 52 malignant lesions, 4 (7.7%) had unevaluable radicality for thermal damage, 7 (13.5%) persisted, and 1 (1.9%) recurred in a follow up ranging from 6 to 36 months. Of the 310 benign lesions, 96.4% had good to excellent cosmetic results without complications, 3 cases (1%) had prolonged pain and edema, 5 cases (1.6%) had hyperplastic scars and 8 cases (2.6%) recurred. CO2 laser microsurgery appears to be a precise and effective alternative treatment modality especially for benign exophytic and critically located lesions.

Keywords

Hydrogen Peroxide Dioxide Sarcoma Peri Rosen 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin, Heidelberg 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. Bandieramonte
    • 1
  • O. Santoro
    • 1
  • P. Lepera
    • 1
  • G. Fava
    • 1
  • G. De Palo
    • 1
  1. 1.National Tumor InstituteMilanoItaly

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