Definitions, Risks, and Indices

  • M. Susser
  • Z. Stein

Abstract

Certain words, often used loosely in everyday language, have acquired a more precise meaning in epidemiology. As a contribution to this exchange between obstetricians, pediatricians, pathologists, and epidemiologists, we begin by defining some of these terms; next, we describe some concepts of risk basic to epidemiologic judgments; lastly, we introduce the terminology we have found useful in approaching neurodevelopmental disability. A fuller source for all this discussion, and one that includes the key references, is Susser et al. (1985).

Keywords

Influenza Stein Hydrocephalus Measle Phenylketonuria 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Freeman JM (ed) (1985) Prenatal and perinatal factors associated with brain disorders. USDHHS, April.Google Scholar
  2. Hagberg B, Hagberg G, Olow I (1984) The changing panorama of cerebral palsy in Sweden. IV. Epidemiological trends 1959-1978. Acta Pediatr Scand 73: 433–440.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Miettinen OS (1974) Proportion of disease caused or prevented by a given exposure, trait or intervention. Am J Epidemiol 99: 325–332.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. Paneth N, Kiely JL (1984) The frequency of cerebral palsy: review of population studies in industrialized nations since 1950. In: Stanley F, Alberman E (eds) Epidemiology of cerebral palsies. Spastics International Medical Publications, London, pp 46–56.Google Scholar
  5. Susser M et al. (1985) Quantitative estimates of prenatal and perinatal risk factors for perinatal mortality, cerebral palsy, mental retardation and epilepsy. In: Freeman JM (ed) Prenatal and perinatal factors associated with brain disorders. USDHHS, pp 359-439.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Susser
  • Z. Stein

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations