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Dexfenfluramine Profile in Quantitative EEG and Its Topographical Aspects

  • C. Sebban
  • K. Le Roch
  • G. Benkemoun
  • C. Debouzy
  • P. Baud
Conference paper

Abstract

Dexfenfluramine chlorhydrate (Isomeride) is a drug used for the treatment of obesity (Finer etal. 1985; Enzi etal. 1986). This compound reduces disorders of eating behavior, with a specific effect on diet selection, carbohydrate-rich meals being decreased while protein consumption is unaffected (Wurtman et al. 1985). Such a shift in diet selection can be produced experimentally by hypothalamic injection of serotonin (5-HT) (Blundell 1984; Leibowitz 1985). Dexfenfluramine is an indirect agonist of 5-HT, increasing its release and inhibiting its reuptake (Garattini etal. 1985). 5-HT terminals are widely distributed in the cerebral cortex, so dexfenfluramine could act on large brain areas. Such a general action can be studied by quantitative EEG (Q-EEG) and its brain mapping. The aim of this study is to describe the EEG variations induced by three different doses of dexfenfluramine in healthy young subjects.

Keywords

Power Variation Alpha Power Diet Selection Scalp Area Placebo Session 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. Sebban
    • 1
  • K. Le Roch
    • 1
  • G. Benkemoun
    • 1
  • C. Debouzy
    • 1
  • P. Baud
    • 2
  1. 1.Explorations FonctionnellesHôpital Charles FoixIvry/SeineFrance
  2. 2.Red Cross Pain CenterHôpital Henry DunantParisFrance

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